Are You Ready for the Second Act of the S.E.C.U.R.E. Act?

Are You Ready for the Second Act of the S.E.C.U.R.E. Act?

July 06, 2021
Share |


THIS MAY BE BIG NEWS!!!!


You may have seen headlines regarding the Securing a Strong Retirement Act, also referred to as the second version of the SECURE Act, or SECURE Act 2.0.

As the bill moves from the House of Representatives to the Senate, many hopeful investors are anticipating further retirement support as the majority of the bill stems from the original SECURE Act of 2019. However, it’s worth noting that the bill may change drastically before being signed into law. With that in mind, here are some potential benefits of the Securing a Strong Retirement Act.

  • Required Minimum Distributions (RMD): For those who contribute to a 401(k) or IRA, the Securing a Strong Retirement Act may allow you to wait until age 75 to start taking RMDs from your retirement accounts.1
  • Catch-up Contributions: Those who own an IRA and are age 62, 63 & 64 may be allowed to contribute an additional $10,000 per year to their retirement accounts.1
  • Student Loans: Employers may be allowed to match retirement contributions for employees who are paying off student loans.1
  • Indexing $1,000 IRA catch up contributions for inflation.

  • Reducing the penalty for failure to take RMDs from 50% of the shortfall to 25%..
  • Allowing penalty-free withdrawals from IRAs and retirement plans for individuals in cases of domestic abuse.

This bill has bipartisan support and has passed the House but not the Senate or The President. There are still some hurdles and we are not sure if and when this will pass. 

There’s little doubt the bill will benefit many retirees or those approaching retirement; the only question that remains is “how.” If you have any questions or you just want to chat, give us a call anytime. We’re always here to help.


Stay Tuned For Updates....

1. Congress.gov, May 5, 2021

Under the SECURE Act, once you reach age 72, you must begin taking required minimum distributions from a Traditional Individual Retirement Account in most circumstances. Withdrawals from Traditional IRAs are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken before age 59½, may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty. You may continue to contribute to a Traditional IRA past age 70½ under the SECURE Act. Contributions to a Traditional IRA may be fully or partially deductible, depending on your adjusted gross income.

Additionally, you must also begin taking required minimum distributions from your 401(k) or other defined-contribution plans in most circumstances at age 72. Withdrawals from your 401(k) or other defined-contribution plans are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken before age 59½, may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite, LLC, is not affiliated with the named representative, broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.

Related Links